Friday, August 11, 2017

How to “Always Pray” Using the Hail Mary and Save the Church & Pope Francis from Errors


Before you read the post in the second section on how to “always pray” using the Hail Mary, please read the following section on the need to pray for our families, the Church and the Pope.


It is sad to say, but in terms of policy and actions, President Trump is by a wide margin more pro-life and pro-family than Pope Francis.

 
(Read lifesitenews.com or my website for the evidence.)

It is just that so many faithful Catholics who love Christ's Church are angry because of the undeniable distorting of Church teachings by Pope Francis and his appointees.
We can use that anger to motivate us to pray and trust God, present the truth of Catholicism by our life & words, expose error, ask that the error be corrected, but most of all pray that we love our family and our neighbor.
Or we can make our anger the center of the universe not trusting that God is the center of the universe.

He is allowing this crisis and is in total control allowing Francis’s free will and our free will in the mix.

As a great priest and exorist said:

The devil wants our focus to be anything, but God. We love our family, our friends and the Church for the sake of God. If we do this we will love them as we should, be at peace and bear fruit for His Kingdom and them.
Remember this when we pray for the Pope or expose his errors and be reminded of what St. Thomas Aquinas said of St. Paul’s rebuke of St. Peter:
-“The manner of the rebuke was fitting, i.e., public and plain."
-'The Apostle opposed Peter in the exercise of authority, not in his authority of ruling.”

In other words, do it God's way.
Pray and ask others to pray for Pope Francis's conversion from the many errors he is spreading and that the Dubia Cardinals issue the correction and correct Francis as St. Paul corrected St. Peter for the good of the Church and the Pope.
Pray the rosary, the Hail Mary and do penance as Our Lady of Fatima requested for these intentions, but most of all to love & adore God first, and love our family, neighbors and the Church for God's sake.
 
(Also, include President Trump in the prayer and penance because the hatred of the world and the devil that is usually directed at pro-life/family popes is targeting him. Pray that God protect the President and give him wisdom.)
Remember that the great catholic cultural historian Christopher Dawson said history is often changed more by saintly Catholics praying than the so-called great men of history.

The following article is posted with the permission of the author James Larson:
The Immaculate Heart of Mary, The Rosary, and The Survival of Our Faith
The rosary, because of its structural content, is something that requires a certain time set aside for its proper recitation. It is clearly the will of God and of Mary that it be part of every person’s daily prayer life. It is the basis of our spiritual childhood lived within Mary’s Immaculate Heart.

It is my belief, however, that especially in these times of virtual universal disorientation and distress, the structured rosary, while indeed being the foundation of our personal prayer life, requires much more in order that such spiritual childhood be protected throughout the day. The rosary itself requires less than one-half hour. If this is all we do, then the rest of the day may well be surrendered almost entirely to forces which seek our spiritual death.

The Hail Mary, on the other hand, takes only about fifteen seconds. There is almost no limitation to the situations and times in which it can be prayed, even in the midst of the most worldly activity; in situations of temptation, anger, doubt, confusion, or even despair; and, especially valuable, as we are falling into sleep. Even if there is only time to pray “Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee”, this provides a powerful means by which we may be affectively drawn into Our Lady’s Heart as her spiritual children. It is in itself, when said in the humble spirit of a simple moment of offering one’s own heart to Our Lady, a most profound act of love and consecration which flees from the world in order to take refuge in Mary’s certain and protecting faith.

Our Lord instructs us that we are “always to pray, and not to faint [lose heart]”. He further makes it quite clear that it is this heart which must be maintained if there is to be any faith upon His return (Luke 18:1-8). For us to truly take this seriously, we must first fully admit that we are extraordinarily vulnerable children who, especially in the overwhelming spiritual crisis of our time, must find refuge in Our Lady’s Immaculate Heart, or perish. The rosary, and especially the frequent praying of the Hail Mary, is the gift from Our Lady to secure us in this certainty of faith.

To Release Love

In his encyclical The Christian Meaning of Human Suffering, Pope John Paul II wrote that “suffering is present in the world in order to release love”. This is a statement that has haunted me for the past 31 years. It has become a principle necessary for my understanding of the crucifixion of the Church which I have witnessed occurring over the past 35 years since my conversion. It has pursued me in my own life, and especially in my children who I have watched grow from the innocence of childhood into being subjected as adults to the crucible of suffering which is this modern Christ-hating world.

It was Blessed Simeon who prophesied to Mary that “thy own soul a sword shall pierce, that out of many hearts, thoughts may be revealed”. This verbal image of Mary’s pierced heart calls to mind the artistic representation of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, pierced by a sword and releasing the flame of love towards Christ, and towards all men and women created in His Image. The spiritual maternity of Mary is, in its most profound essence, the transforming of human pain and suffering into the light and life of Christ. When, through the praying of the Hail Mary, we place ourselves and those we love within Her Heart, we are therefore exercising the supreme mercy towards souls for the glorification of God.

The Rosary and the Hail Mary are not therefore primarily about focusing on our own personal sanctification, but rather about striking the fire of love upon the flint of our hearts hardened by the effects of original and actual sin. If it be true, according to Christ’s words, that we must die to self in order to gain self, then it must be equally true that in our prayer life it is in loving God and praying for souls that we are meant to be perfected in that love which cannot help but be our sanctification. If our prayers are beset by dullness it is most likely because they are, at least secretly, turned inwards primarily towards ourselves.
Focusing on self-love, even in the virtuous cause of self-sanctification, inevitably leads to the torpidity of spirit which is possibly the most constant effect of original sin upon our minds and hearts. Interiorly, we are all dull unless our hearts erupt into love.

This is why the “other half” of the Fatima message concerns the necessity of reparation. We tend to conceive of the Catholic concept of reparation only in terms of “making reparation” for offenses committed against God. But the term reparation is a relational term. Reparation is therefore primarily concerned with the militant effort to “repair” souls to God. This is the most profound way in which we glorify God and make “reparation” for the offenses committed against Him.

The Rosary and Hail Mary are therefore prayers of “repair” not only for ourselves, but for others. And since our own hearts are most easily moved out of dullness not only by our own personal suffering but by the sufferings of those we love (our spouses, children, friends, and the whole suffering Church and world), then the Rosary and Hail Mary prayed for those we love should be the means by which our hearts are set afire. It is in this fire that our hearts become one with Mary, and through her to Jesus: “I am come to cast fire on the earth: and what will I, but that it be kindled?” (Luke 12: 49).

The Rosary is a violent prayer, demanding a violent love. Our Lord said that “the Kingdom of heaven suffereth violence and the violent bear it away”. Such a concept may indeed come as a shock to those who envision the Rosary as a prayer predominantly consisting of peaceful meditations and gentle consolations. If, however, St. Dominic is correct in considering that it is through the Scapular (consecration to Mary) and the Rosary that the world will be saved, then we should be willing to seriously consider that these devotions necessitate the violence and “fire” of which Our Lord speaks.

The nature of this “violence” is unraveled by Our Lord in that same parable which contains the two passages we have already examined concerning prayer and its relation to the question of Our Lord as to whether there will be any faith left when He returns:

"And he spoke also a parable to them, that we ought always to pray, and not to faint, saying: There was a judge in a certain city who feared not God, nor regarded man. And there was a certain widow in that city, and she came to him, saying: Avenge me of my adversary. And he would not for a long time. But afterwards he said within himself: Although I fear not God, nor regard man, yet because this widow is troublesome to me, I will avenge her, lest continually coming she weary me. And the Lord said: Hear what the unjust judge saith. And will not God revenge his elect who cry to him day and night: and will he have patience in their regard? I say to you, that he will quickly revenge them. But yet the Son of man, when he cometh, shall he find, think you, faith on earth?"

We need to penetrate to the spirit of this passage if we are to understand Our Lord’s demand that we “always pray” and not lose heart, and the connection which this fervent and persistent prayer bears to the survival of faith.

The widow who is the object of this parable is clearly operating almost totally in the realm of passion – of vehement anger and vengefulness. Obviously, when considering what Christ is trying here to impart to his listeners, this is a metaphor for spiritual realities. We see this sort of figure of speech used often in scripture, as for instance when scripture speaks of God’s anger. God is not subject to sensible passions. The word “anger” is thus used as a metaphor for His judgment and chastisement. All the violent language used in this passage is therefore constituted as a parable signifying those “elect” who will retain their faith because they “cry to Him day and night”.

There is, however, another great distinction to be made between the widow and the “elect”. The widow’s cry comes naturally. She is consumed by passion, and her vengefulness consumes her night and day. She does not have to labor to make this thing come alive in her heart. This is not true of the “cry” of the elect.

The Rosary and Hail Mary are a cry of the will. They may sometimes be accompanied by sentiment or passion, but this certainly is not the norm, nor does it provide sufficient motivation for the “praying always’ commanded by Our Lord. In order for them to become habitual, we must make a very conscious commitment to militantly praying “day and night”. It is not enough therefore to sit back and rest in the fact that we “say” our daily Rosary. We must strive with all our heart to correspond with the unceasing love of the Immaculate Heart of Mary. This, I believe, can be accomplished by the constant effort to extend our daily Rosary throughout the day by the frequent praying of the Hail Mary. It is a work of love.

"Pray, pray a great deal and make many sacrifices, for many souls
go to Hell because they have no one to make sacrifices and to pray for them
.”
Our Lady of Fatima (Aug 17, 1917)
James Larson

(Click to read Larson's whole article: http://www.waragainstbeing.com/node/59)




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